SMCLA 2014 Recap

SMCLA May Event
SMCLA Attendees at the May event

Happy New Year and welcome to 2015!

SMCLA is very thankful to those who have attended, shared, or supported any of our events in the last year. As such, SMCLA wanted to create a 2014 recap of our events for anyone who did not get a chance to attend or wanted to glean insights from them.

Please see the below for direct links to our event recaps:

Social Media Club Los Angeles Kicks Off The New Year At The Craftsman

Recruiter Insights Shared At SMCLA’s February Event: ‘If Your LinkedIn Profile Looks Bad, You’ve Got A Problem’

LA Educational Leaders Deliver Insightful Social Media in Education Panel

Pros Deliver Winning Panel on Social Media and Sports

“Social Media Made The Video Star” A Success

Top L.A. Broadcast, Print Journalists Hit Up Social Media Week Los Angeles to Discuss Social Media’s Far-Reaching Impact On News Content Development and Distribution

SMCLA Beyond Fashion Panel

Impressive Nov. SMCLA WordPress Workshop Resulted in These Learnings

SMCLA Holiday Party & Giving Back

Overall, it has been a year for the record books and SMCLA is very excited to bring more events, parties, networking opportunities in 2015. Stay tuned for more!

If you would to learn more about Social Media Club Los Angeles or join us, check out our Social Media Club Los Angeles membership page to learn more or join us. Also, if you’d like to participate by volunteering with us, send us an email: socialmediaclubla@gmail.com, tweet us @SMC_LA or like us Facebook.com/SocialMediaClubLA.

Tonight’s Panel on Sports & Social Media

Social Media Club of Los Angeles (SMCLA)

7:00pm – 9:00pm @ Blankspaces (www.blankspaces.com)

With the World Series approaching and the NFL season kicking off, we’re at a perfect point to discuss sports in social media. Recent flare ups with NFL policymakers and ESPN’s recent missteps on social media policy have really put social media in the sports world at the forefront of our awareness.  It’s time to discuss some of the key issues around the topic.

Panelists:

  • K.P. Anderson (@ikpanderson)
    • Executive Producer of E! Television’s “The Soup” and the spinoff “Sports Soup” on Versus.
  • David Wu
    • Mr. David Wu is the CEO of FantasyWorld.com, a social website that allows celebrities and fans to interact directly. Prior to FantasyWorld, David served as CEO of RotoHog, a Fantasy Sports company he co-founded with a Wharton professor. David attended UCLA for undergrad, and the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, for his MBA studies.
  • Chris Manning (@LD2K)
  • Tiffany Trevizo
    • Tiffany races motocross, surfs, skateboards, scuba dives and is an all around action sports athlete. Works with Zexsports; The action sports media network and Women In Action Sports an organization for women in the action sports industry and proffessional athletes aspiring for new opportunities.
  • Denise Garciano (@niecee)
    • Denise is the Social Media Manager for Pacific Sunwear (http://www.pacificsunwear.com).  She is an industry leading Sports Marketer, and has an extensive background joining and participating in almost every social network ever invented (and some that have yet to be invented).
  • Justin Ramers (Active.com)
    • Justin Ramers oversees social media initiatives for The Active Network’s family of properties including Active.com, eteamz.com, CoolRunning.com, LaxPower.com and the SportsPower franchise. In addition, Ramers is responsible for leveraging social media to promote Active’s consumer products and properties throughout the Internet.

Discussion Points:

  • How does social media change the way we experience sports?
  • What are some examples of athletes, leagues, teams and broadcasters using social media in the last year?
    • Positive examples: The Real SHAQ, Stewart Cink, 360 coverage of games/tournaments, AM570, Guest hosts on Jim Rome, NBC Olympics & athlete blogs
    • Negative examples: ESPN policymakers, league fines & penalties, Tweeting during games
  • How do we see this evolving?  What can the fan expect in the next year? 3 years? 5 years?
  • How does this affect the sponsors?  What can they do to continue to be supportive while still benefiting from their involvement?
  • What are some opportunities in the sports marketing field created by social media?
  • What are the dangers of athletes using social media? For teams, leagues, sponsors?  Is this any different from existing risks and control measures placed on post-game interviews and off-field behavior?

Thank You to our Event Sponsors:

www.filtrbox.com – Real Time Social Media Monitoring

www.blankspaces.com – Los Angeles’s #1 Coworking Office Space

www.resumebucket.com – Upload your resume for FREE

Yogi Berra on Social Media

Yogi Berra: Eternal Yankee by Alan Barra

As a warmup to next week’s meeting on Sports and Social Media, I thought a few reflections from one of the greatest baseball players of all time would be appropriate.

Last week, I started reading a book called “Yogi Berra: Eternal Yankee” and am amazed by how much I have learned about Yogi so far.  I am only up to page 70 in the book, but I am already convinced that Yogi is (was) the best catcher who played the game (sorry Bill Dickey and Johnny Bench).

While I am not a Yankees fan, I am a baseball fan and the book is a fascinating read so far as it traces Yogi’s roots from a boyhood in St. Louis (Joe Garagiola grew across the street from him) to minor league baseball teams in Norfolk and Newark to a short stint in the U.S. Navy (he was at Omaha Beach on D-Day) and then as a 21-year-old rookie for the New York Yankees in 1947.

So, who knew his real name is Lawrence Peter Berra?

And can you believe that his first year salary with the Yankees was only $5000 (doesn’t A-Rod make that in 5 minutes?) and he had to work in the hardware department of Sears in his off-season?

While thinking about the impact Yogi has made on the sport of baseball, I imagined the impact that Yogi would have if he had been talking about social media instead.  Yogi was and still is a colorful personality who is well known for his malapropisms and for fracturing the English language.  So, I have taken a few of his famous quotes or “Yogisms” and interpreted them as if Yogi was really talking about social media.

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

This Yogism is a perfect analogy to social media.  Implementing social media successfully requires a lot of experimentation to test what will work in a specific situation and what won’t work.  With the social media landscape changing so rapidly, Yogi is urging us to remain flexible as something that worked last month may not work next month.  So, if you come to a fork in the social media road – take both forks and keep trying.

In baseball, you don’t know nothing.

And in social media, most people don’t know nothing either.  There are many people who claim to know it all and there are many people who say they are practicing social media when they aren’t.  Yogi is telling us to keep learning and pushing the envelope.  If you think you know it all, then you have stopped thinking.

Social media (or baseball) is ninety percent mental. The other half is physical.

Implementing social media is not just something you think about or do once and move on.  In other words, social media is like putting Rogaine on a bald man’s head – you have to keep at it on a daily basis.  Yogi is telling us to put in a strong effort on the strategy and pre-game preparation, but then you must actually put in the same or greater effort on a daily basis out on the playing field.

If people don’t want to come out to the ballpark, how are you going to stop them?

Likewise, you can’t stop people from not visiting your website or participating in your community.  Baseball teams have to field a compelling product (i.e. a winning team) if they want fans to come to the ballpark.  In the same manner, Yogi’s advice is that companies need to provide a compelling reason for customers to visit their website and to interact with them in today’s competitive environment.  Are you interacting with your customers and prospects – or just talking at them?  Are you providing multiple ways for customers to find you online?

You can observe a lot by watching

There is a lot to be said for lurking.  Most of what I have learned about social media came from seeing what worked for other people and then testing it myself.  Social media is so new and is transforming so quickly that most people have learned their craft through on-the-job-training.  Yogi compels us to keep observing and pay attention to what is working (or not working) for others.

Finally, I want to leave you with a final Yogism and with a few links to explore:

And remember…

The game isn’t over until it’s over.

…so play hard all nine innings!

[note: this post originally appeared in my Social Media Musings blog]

9/22 Sports and Social Media Panel – First Panelists Announced…

We’re very pleased to announce our first two panelists for the 9/22 Sports and Social Media event.

K.P. Anderson (@ikpanderson)
Bio: Executive Producer of E! Television’s “The Soup” and the spinoff “Sports Soup” on Versus.

Sweet! A sports mind with some humor mixed in. We’re liking this one. More to come this week as we close our panelists!

David Wu

Bio: Mr. David Wu is the CEO of FantasyWorld.com, a social website that allows celebrities and fans to interact directly. Prior to FantasyWorld, David served as CEO of RotoHog, a Fantasy Sports company he co-founded with a Wharton professor. David attended UCLA for undergrad, and the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, for his MBA studies.

Phew! Just in time to help me out with my crappy fantasy football draft picks. I wonder if I can glean any sort of advantage using social media. You think @OGOchoCinco and his 60 tweets a day will help?)

Sports and Social Media – The_REAL_SHAQ Effect

How does Social Media change the way athletes, fans, leagues, teams, broadcasters and sponsors interact?

Brought to you by:

FiltrBox


Filtrbox.com – Real-Time social media monitoring simplified.

Join SMCLA (http://www.socialmediaclub.la) Tuesday September 22nd, 2009 at 7pm-9:30pm at Blankspaces (LA)(http://www.blankspaces.com)  to discuss the following topics:

  • How does social media change the way we experience sports?
  • What are some examples of athletes, leagues, teams and broadcasters using social media in the last year?
    • Positive examples: The Real SHAQ, Stewart Cink, 360 coverage of games/tournaments, AM570, Guest hosts on Jim Rome, NBC Olympics &athlete blogs
    • Negative examples: ESPN policymakers, league fines & penalties, Tweeting during games
  • How do we see this evolving?  What can the fan expect in the next year? 3 years? 5 years?
  • How does this affect the sponsors?  What can they do to continue to be supportive while still benefiting from their involvement?
  • What are some opportunities in the sports marketing field create by social media?
  • What are the dangers of athletes using social media? For teams, leagues, sponsors?  Is this any different from existing risks and control measures placed on post-game interviews and off-field behavior?

With the World Series approaching and the NFL season kicking off, we’re at a perfect point to discuss sports in social media. Recent flare ups with NFL policymakers and ESPN’s recent missteps on social media policy have really put social media in the sports world at the forefront of our awareness.  It’s time to discuss some of the key issues around the topic.

(Panelists TBD and will be added as they sign up)

Events